The Sorrows of Young Werewolf (eyeteeth) wrote,
The Sorrows of Young Werewolf
eyeteeth

Obsessing our private lives



Ooh, preachy! But people seem to like that. When I got all Milgram my site got an unprecedented number of hits that wasn't surpassed until I got all bitter liberal. Those are the two most popular comics on the site, so I guess more people can identify with my political concerns than with my love of lobotomy humor, which is probably a good thing. I guess.

You might remember the interest in W. H. Auden's September 1, 1939 provoked by 9/11, and that is a fantastic poem and one that I think is more relevant today than it was then, so allow me to be maybe not the first person to encourage you to read it again. (I'm told Auden hated that poem by the end of his life, but that's just too bad for him. Famous artists often come to hate their greatest hits: I'm also told that Adam Duritz refuses to play "Mr. Jones" at Counting Crows concerts.) I was tempted to illustrate part of that poem, actually, but when I tried to pull a piece out I discovered I couldn't: you need the whole thing, and I don't have permission to publish the whole thing in a comic. But I realized today that the poem I find most relevant of all right now is Allen Ginsberg's America. I'm trying to come to the point./I refuse to give up my obsession./America stop pushing I know what I'm doing. That's a good poem all the time but maybe a little more now than usual, at least for me.

Here is an excellent recording of Ginsberg reading an early version of the poem:



Plus, now that I think about it, being as how Ginsberg's mother was lobotomized, there's a non-zero chance that he met Walter. What on Earth would the two of them have had to say to each other?
Tags: allen ginsberg, americastoppushingiknowwhati'mdoing, gruesome contemporary information, gruesome historical information, neverforget, plus ginsberg's mom was lobotomized, poetry, she got the prefrontal kind i think, stanley milgram, stix, the unmentionable odor of death, tinyfists, w. h. auden, walter freeman
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